Adobe creative cloud.

May 7, 2013

Yesterday, Adobe (Photoshop, Dreamweaver and other things you don’t pay for already) announced that it was moving from a ‘product based’ purchasing model to a subscription based, cloud service.  What does Adobe creative cloud mean and how does this affect the users?  What is a cloud based service and why have they done this?

Adobe creative cloud. MeBox

 

 What is Adobe creative cloud?

Adobe creative cloud

Adobe creative cloud is a name for all the Adobe products (Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Fireworks etc) that usually you pay for (ha!) as a single payment.  It used to be a standard product purchase model.  You want to edit images, you pay for the software and you use it.  It was about £400-£500 for Photoshop CS6 for example.

Now you’ll be paying per month for the various products you want to use.  Photoshop for instance is about £18 a month.  The whole kit, everything, is just shy of £50 per month.

So, Adobe creative cloud is basically every product that Adobe has sold but rather than paying one off, you pay per month.

Why has Adobe decided to do this?

Most people are going to say it’s for three reasons.  Make money, prevent piracy and cloud is the future.  Well according to Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen, it’s not about the money.  It will help prevent piracy however, but making sure that people are online to get updates it can check to see if you’ve paid.  Is cloud the future? Well cloud based services are certainly becoming more and more popular, some people might refer to EA games recent SimCity DRM (digital rights management) malarky, meaning that everyone has to be online to use the product bought, but Adobe assures us that it can be used offline.

Adobe wants to be able to update your product, make sure it runs well and is optimised.  Frankly, paying less per month than the whole package and getting regular updates, along with having offline use, that seems fair to me.

What does cloud based service mean?

Dropbox Adobe creative cloud MeBoxThe term ‘in the cloud’ refers to a way of managing digital stuff, its not a place or a actual item, it’s a service and use term like marketing or best practice.  We don’t want to get too detailed, but the main idea is that you don’t have your data (applications, programs, photos, music etc) on your actual device (phone, laptop etc).  It means having someone else worry about storing all your stuff somewhere else, but you can access it anywhere.

There are a few variations, like Dropbox, which is like an extra hard drive on the internet.  You can upload stuff like photos and download them or view them anywhere in the world.  Other types of cloud based services are like Spotify, where you have all the music in the world at your fingertips.

Most services will let you download a certain amount, if not all you want, but the point is that you can access it from anywhere.

Adobe creative cloud will allow users to download their program and run it.  However there are a ton of other features that will be hosted in the cloud.  From Behance portfolios to file storage.

Why are people annoyed at the move?

There’s no doubt that change freaks people out, despite the fact that Adobe is a business and needs to adapt it’s model to fit with current trends.  People get annoyed with Kodak for going under because they didn’t change their model.

It is a radical shift, but done right, no one will be left out.  The price is cheaper and you get more bang for your buck.  You can use it offline and you’ll always have the latest version.

Who is really upset about Abode creative cloud?  People who don’t pay for their CS products now.  CS products are laughably easy to hack.  Sure you might miss out on updates, but most of the time, hackers can fix that too.  Cracking a CS product means you download a trial version for free, crack it and get the whole product for free.

Lets face it, the only people who say it will ‘kill small businesses and freelancers’ are people who aren’t paying for it.  I run a business and I sure as hell don’t give away free products, why should Adobe.  There are tons of free alternatives if you want them

Michael

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